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MY PERSONAL TRUTH. One of many. #Instagram #Philly #Philadelphia #PhillyPhiasco #Inspiration #Motivation #Determination #Dedication #Aspiration #Africa #AfricanKing #AfricanQueen #BlackPride #BlackPower #WARRIOR #Tumblr #Kemetic #AFRICANHERITAGE #Power #LifeLessons

TONIGHT, I’ll be featuring at Legends restaurant in Burlington, NJ! I’ve been off the scene a bit, but I just couldn’t pass this wonderful opportunity up! Please come on out to SUPPORT me and all the other poets and show LOVE! It’s an open mic, so YOU can spit too! Oh, and the best part? IT’S FREE! See you there! Xoxo #instagram #Philly #Philadelphia #Poetry #SpokenWord #Music #Art #Culture #African #AfricanAmerican #Food #Family #Fun #Feature #LivePerformance #Tumblr

KNOW thyself, LOVE thyself, HEAL thyself. It’s the ONLY way. (And don’t even worry about this statement appearing to leave the Creator out. I am of GOD, and GOD is of ME; since I’m getting to KNOW the Creator, getting to LOVE the Creator, the Creator will ultimately HEAL ME). I’m taking the time out to do so, so please excuse me if my physical presence becomes scarce for some time. Don’t take this personally. I’ve got WORK to do. Please just understand. <3 #Instagram #Tumblr #Truth #Philly #Philadelphia #KNOWTHYSELF #Spiritual #God #Creator #Universe #Love #African #Metaphysics #BlackPride #BlackPower #Discovery #BlackMan #BlackWoman #RISE #RBG

diosasalnatural:

Nellisa from Santurce, Puerto Rico
We asked Nellisa (who has been donning her beautiful locs for 14 years) what was her opinion of the term “Pelo malo/Bad hair” (translated from Spanish):

The concept or term “pelo malo” is rooted in racism, and for many people, anything with a black/African origin has a negative connotation, they see it as unorganized or unkempt.  There is no such thing as “pelo malo.” Our hair is strong, it has life, and it grows.

About her locs:

There are peope who ask if I’m Jamaican, Haitian, or from some other island in the Caribbean and I am 100% Puerto Rican.  People can’t place a black woman with dread locs as being “Puerto Rican.”  It’s like that combination doesn’t make sense to them.  Sometimes people forget that slavery existed here on the island, in addition to being “Americanized,” as we are constantly getting a lot of influence and inspiration from other countries.

 Photo by: Joaquin Medina for Diosas Al Natural
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS REBEL T3i
ISO
200
Aperture
f/5
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
60mm

diosasalnatural:

Nellisa from Santurce, Puerto Rico

We asked Nellisa (who has been donning her beautiful locs for 14 years) what was her opinion of the term “Pelo malo/Bad hair” (translated from Spanish):

The concept or term “pelo malo” is rooted in racism, and for many people, anything with a black/African origin has a negative connotation, they see it as unorganized or unkempt.  There is no such thing as “pelo malo.” Our hair is strong, it has life, and it grows.

About her locs:

There are peope who ask if I’m Jamaican, Haitian, or from some other island in the Caribbean and I am 100% Puerto Rican.  People can’t place a black woman with dread locs as being “Puerto Rican.”  It’s like that combination doesn’t make sense to them.  Sometimes people forget that slavery existed here on the island, in addition to being “Americanized,” as we are constantly getting a lot of influence and inspiration from other countries.

 Photo by: Joaquin Medina for Diosas Al Natural

gradientlair:

screamed-the-dustspeck:

Nicki Minaj casually dismantles sexism while applying her eyeliner

This was, legitimately, my very first impression of Nicki Minaj. And this is the reason why, to this day, I have the utmost respect for her, even though I don’t like all of her music.

Another epic moment of deconstruction of sexism by Nicki Minaj. I remain in awe, which is new for me as I wasn’t always aware of her insights, though I saw this particular video before.

I love her similar moments discussing White mainstream media and sexism/misogynoir in the industry. Your womanist lessons come in all spaces, not just books! <3

Damn, Nicki! Xoxo

(Source: upworthy.com)

These days, before we talk about misogyny, women are increasingly being asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings. Don’t say, “Men oppress women” – that’s sexism, as bad as any sexism women ever have to handle, possibly worse. Instead, say, “Some men oppress women.” Whatever you do, don’t generalise. That’s something men do. Not all men – just some men.

This type of semantic squabbling is a very effective way of getting women to shut up. After all, most of us grew up learning that being a good girl was all about putting other people’s feelings ahead of our own. We aren’t supposed to say what we think if there’s a chance it might upset somebody else or, worse, make them angry. So we stifle our speech with apologies, caveats and soothing sounds. We reassure our friends and loved ones that “you’re not one of those men who hate women”.

What we don’t say is: of course not all men hate women. But culture hates women, so men who grow up in a sexist culture have a tendency to do and say sexist things, often without meaning to. We aren’t judging you for who you are but that doesn’t mean we’re not asking you to change your behaviour. What you feel about women in your heart is of less immediate importance than how you treat them on a daily basis.

You can be the gentlest, sweetest man in the world yet still benefit from sexism. That’s how oppression works.

Of course all men don’t hate women. But all men must know they benefit from sexism (via brute-reason)

Black women cannot even mention the word sexism because then we are accused of hating Black men and are called emasculating bitches who want to destroy the Black community.

We are not allowed to discuss misogyny Black women face on a large scale platform. Sexism is a non issue because RACISM is the true issue, and any sort of feminist thought is the white devil’s infiltration.

(via sourcedumal)

(Source: brutereason)

There Will Come A Time…

…when I will be taken far, far away to a secret, secluded place to HEAL. Tears will fall silently down my face as I realize a new Truth has been bestowed upon me.

Two tall, beautiful Guardian Angels draped in long, flowing robes of white, sky blue and gold will take me by the hands and guide me to a BEAUTIFUL oasis and gently they will swiftly and silently strip me of my old, torn, dirty, worn-out clothes and shoes.

The two Guardian Angels will then step back and tell me to close my eyes and walk slowly into the water. With eyes closed, all of my other senses will heighten, therefore enabling me to see CLEARER than I’ve EVER seen, they tell me.

I will close my eyes, I will do what they say. My body, my senses…Will prove the Angels RIGHT. I will let the cooling sensation of the rippling turquoise water flow all throughout my body as it rises higher on me with each step. The water will reach my waist, and I will hear a woman’s soft voice whisper in my left ear to turn around and face the direction from which I just came (eyes still closed).

I will do so.

Then, I will find myself naturally lying back and gently pushing off the sandy floor with my right foot and drifting away…out into the water…I’ll drift on water…on spirits…my ancestors…and Soul.

And this is where I will remain for quite some time.

~Kiema Norris-Dozier, {Visions}

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